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June 02, 2012, 10:04:58 pm
Garland English
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Hi gator ,Gail, and Didi,I just finished watching on the History Channel about a real family fued I had heard about all of my life.It made the Ewings and Barnes fued look mild.It was "The Hatfields and the McCoys".They are not at war anymore,and it is not unusual to see a Hatfield marry a McCoy.It happenned right after The Civil War when Virginia seceeded from the Union and the area now known as West Virginia suceeded from Virginia and sided with the North.They became a state in 1863.I can't believe it all started over a pig.Anyway it reminds me today of the Republicans and Democrats.They fight each other over getting elected and after the election,they make deals and make up until the next election.It is always a deal that is not good for the country.This yaer's election won't be any different,although it could be a Republican sweep and might be marginally true,but that is all.The assassination of Abraham Lincoln and Reconstruction of the South was not good for either side.Gator is right about Robert E. Lee,he foresaw a lot of the things we are facing today.I felt sorrow for both the Hatfields and McCoys,but none for Democrats and Republicans.Who needs a Socialist Party when we have them?
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June 03, 2012, 10:14:52 am
gator
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We watched all three episodes. Fantastic production...excellent cast. Just a little hard to understand the diction, though, once in a while with those heavy southern, hillbilly "drawls". But, nonetheless: what a tragic, TRUE, story. Costner said that they did detailed investigations as to the accuracy of the whole historical story. God, what a tragedy.....14.8 million viewers for episode 3---damn, not even Harry's Law drew those numbers....Now, if only "Dallas" can..................................

It's Sunday, Bunchers, and I gotta OTR in one hour. Need to be in St Louis at 7 AM tomorrow, and I don't feel like crancking out a "nightshift" run....so, now or never. Til next time, boys...take very good care. Maybe Eric will grace us with a tid bit or two by next weekend.........MAYBE!!!!!  Confused..................................................... Laughing

And as to last night's Dallas episode, "D" was pretty much regulated to "ornament" status; just a few filler lines here and there, and no follow thru from previous episode on the "her and JR" thing...but we KNOW that's coming. (yeah, I know...whoopie-twang, who cares? But...it's STILL a Shelton thing, and we ARE in "pre_Dallas" mode. So, what the hell? Keep the 'eternal flame' glowing)

Chat with ya' soon, Bunch-Bros. (Papa G, you know how to reach me if necessary. Otherwise, I'll find ya')

Gator......"g"one for now
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June 03, 2012, 01:53:10 pm
Erik
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I'm a bit of a Civil War buff myself, even though I'm not American.

Had Virginia stayed in the Union, Lee, who possessed the greatest military mind in the nation, would have been the Union General - his heart was totally with his home state of Virginia. When Virginia seceeded - and the vote was quite close, if I recall correctly - Lee chose to head the military of the CSA.

There were several slave states that never seceeded from the Union, like Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri. In fact, secessionist governments were actually set up in Kentucky and Missouri, but those states never actually seceeded. That's why the Confederate battle flag, the Southern Cross, has 13 stars when there were only 11 Confederate states - the extra two stars represented Kentucky and Missouri.

One fact that is largely unknown today, on both sides of your northern border, is that Canada was allied with the Confederacy. Britain sided with the CSA, therefore so did we. It's a relationship that has persisted through both World Wars. Had Great Britain sided with Hitler, so would we have.

Therefore, I'll follow that shot of Canadian Club with a Jack Daniels chaser... icon_wink
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June 04, 2012, 02:34:21 pm
Garland English
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To the South,or the Confederacy,it was a question of "states rights".The institution of slavery was not an issue unless they thought it was.The economics of slavery was because the southern states wanted the territories to become slave states and the north did not.To Lincoln secession was a rebellion that he wanted to defeat.The institution of slavery became an issue when Lincoln issued his Emancipation Proclamation almost halfway through the war.It did not have the effect of law,but sparked a lot of sentiment against slavery.The 10th amendment to the Constitution,part of the Bill of Rights,was for the states to assume authority while the Unitd States could not.Without the promise of a Bill of rights,it is unlikely that the states would have ratified the Constitution.The same thing would have been true if slavery was abolished by the Constitution in1787 since all 13 states had slavery at that time..The issue came up but was decided against.It is clear from the Lincoln-Douglas debates,for a Senate seat that Lincoln was against the mixing of the races,but did not believe in slavery.In spite of the Emancipation Proclamation Abraham Lincoln wanted the war to end even if it didn't solve the slave issue.No doubt He would have opposed Reconstruction that was more about punishing the South than freeing slaves.It was the 13th amendment that ended slavery and was ratified in December of 1865.
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June 04, 2012, 03:22:45 pm
Garland English
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What really bothered the South was the 14th amandment,which was about equality of citizens,mostly meant for blacks.This was done during Reconstruction and the southern states were forced to vote for ratification.Robert E. Lee saw this as a problem in the future to give the Federal Government a license to ignore the soverign rights of a state and impose it's will on the states.What seemed like a states right  against having anything imposed on them is now thought of as the Feds being a superior body over the states.The states founded the Federal Government,not the other way around.This is what the states in the 1780s feared and did not trust the constituion as draftedThere were the Federalists who supported the constitution as is and the anti-federalists who opposed such as Patrick Henry,Virginia's first governor.He was very clear about a bill  of rights and what it should be. His side won but as the people slept,the government is considered the superior body in today's time. There are specific duties to be carried out by the government,but no more than the Constitution allows.Foriegn policy,forming a military,and a few other things,but after delivering the mail,they are supposed to leave us alone.one example is the Marxist income tax right out of the pages of the Communist Manifesto.The Supreme Court reuled rightfully that was unconstitutional because the Constitution did not authorize Congress to tax peoples' incomes.The 16th amendment changed that and now we have a Gestapo or a Soviet style KGB picking our pockets.Today they have an agency that dictates to the people in every facet of life,some not being as powerful as others,but they are working on it.I hope this doesn't draw the wrath of socialist minded people,but I won't be surprised.
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June 04, 2012, 03:39:55 pm
Garland English
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I would like to say that Virginia did not have near as many slaves as they once did.An entire community of freed blacks was formed by them on Pocahontas Island in the Appomattox River that runs through Petersburg.The deep southern states were the first to seccede and the upper southern states followed.I think in Kentucky,which has a southern type lifestyle voted not to seceede in a close vote.I am reffering to the state legislators,not a referendum by the people.                                                                     Well gator,I hope this is enough for you while you are away.Since Debbie is from Virginia,i don't think this is too far off topic.
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June 05, 2012, 03:07:23 pm
Garland English
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After the battle of Gettysburg,Abraham Lincoln gave his Gettyburg Address.In it he said"We are a government of the people,by the people, and for the people".That is changing to the people being of the government,by the government and for the government.
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June 06, 2012, 01:51:58 pm
Erik
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Great points all around Garland - very informative. Many people today naively believe the Civil War was fought over "slavery", when it was really a struggle of States vs. Federal rights, as you correctly point out. Slavery was simply the issue that brought the struggle to a head, as it were.

Sadly, in spite of the blood and sacrifice of this horrific conflict, which turned American against American and brother against brother, the present-day Federal Government has quietly been increasing its power, eroding that of the states, and ignoring the Constitution. Not surprising then that the present-day American political elite is terrified of a strict Constitutionalist like Dr. Ron Paul!

Finally, and FWIW, the USA is not the only western nation where citizens are being crushed under the weight of massive government and over-governance. As a Canadian, I know where of I speak... Roll eyes
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June 07, 2012, 05:25:43 pm
Garland English
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Yes Erik,I am aware of some of the things happening in Canada..
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June 10, 2012, 02:56:51 pm
didi
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and i would spare you the description of what's happening here.....
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We have no future, we have no past
I write this now while I'm in control
I'll choose the words and how the melody goes,
Along winding streets we walked hand in hand
And how I long for that sharp wind
To take my breath away again
I'd run my fingers through your hair.
 

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